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sectors, it did not necessarily intend to do so. In other words, creole rhetoric originated as an instrument in the hands of creoles and for the benefit of creoles, but Indians and blacks used this very rhetoric to claim their freedom and equality. The rhetoric was thus a double-edged knife with unintended consequences. The weapon used by creoles turned against them; the discourse seeking to assert their hegemony was turned, by the oppressed, into a challenge of that very hegemony.

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